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Book review: D.L. Finn – The Button (@dlfinnauthor )

Lynn hadn’t had an easy life, but a failed suicide attempt left her able to hear the voices reviewof angels, or more specifically the voices of those who watched over her, Thomas and Zelina. Long ago Thomas had made a mistake, one that had consequences on Lynn’s life, and he was determined to set things back on track, but they could only guide her, it was up to her if she listened. When Lynn wakes next to a dead body with no idea how she got there she begins to panic. There was a reason Lynn’s life had been difficult, she was firmly in the sights of Dian, an evildwel, a being that lives of fear and anger, and it has attached itself to someone in her life, but something bigger is in the works, a hidden quest, the kidnapping of her friend Stacy, and the strange shooting of ‘good cops’. Is it all connected, or is this just another unlucky run in the tragedy that became Lynn’s life?

The Button is a thrilling and tense paranormal mystery / romance by D.L. Finn. It focuses around Lynn, the two angels watching over her, and the evildwel and alternates between their point of view whilst remaining in a gripping third-person narrative. Lynn is a good protagonist for this story, and you’ll spend the first half of the book wondering who she should put her trust in Kent, the handsome bartender met the same night she was drugged to wake up next to a dead drug dealer, or her step-brother Warren, who has returned into her life. I enjoyed the guessing and air of mystery, as well as the tense and escalating plot. Action, terror, adventure, and tragedy combine to make a tense tale of trust, betrayal, and a little dose of divine intervention.

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Book review: James Musgrave – The Spiritualist Murders (@englishmajorpub )

Clara was one of only two women practising law in San Francisco, as such she had a lot reviewto prove, but she also had good instincts. Instincts that saw her befriend Adeline, a young woman she found in distress. When finally she returned to her senses, Adeline confesses to witnessing a murder, in fact, of the witnesses called she was the only who witnessed it happen, and yet she was refused the right to testify, why? Because she not only witnessed the murder, she heard the thoughts of the one committing it. The killer was set free, and Clara is determined to use Adeline and her perfect recall along with her ability to channel other people’s thoughts and memories to get to the bottom of what happened. But how can you prove something when your evidence is only the word of someone who could be called crazy? You search for evidence of course, but Clara must be careful, the killer believes he can control anyone, but why commit these acts in the first place, is it to show their power, or is there something else afoot?

Written in a style suitable for the era James Musgrave’s The Spiritualist Murders:  Portia of the Pacific Historical Mysteries book 2 delivers an intense and vivid scene of San Francisco in the 1880s. While I can’t speak to historical accuracy due to unfamiliarity, the feel of the work if very authentic to the time. Musgrave possesses an enjoyable narrative that will appeal to a mature audience, as well as those who enjoy a well-worded and conceived plot. As a murder mystery, you are of course asking yourself the how and why, and the spiritual twists gives this book a little something extra. Controversy, challenges, sexism, manipulation, and agendas both concealed and visible drive the mysteries and the characters forward in a novel that is bound to please lovers of the genre who are looking for something just a little bit different.

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Book Review: Bounty by J.D. Cunegan (@JD_Cunegan )

Jill Anderson had already spent three years serving the people of Baltimore, it had reviewallowed her to build up a tolerance to crime scenes, but it took every ounce of her restraint not to react to this one. If her peers knew she had known the victim she would be off the case. But she knew her special insight would help to find the people responsible. The victim of the brutal murder was Trent Roberts. He was a recognised scientist, best known for his work in prosthetics and cybernetics.  There was, however, another thing, something spoken of only as hushed rumours, and that was Project Fusion. Jill had first-hand knowledge of this secret undertaking, in fact, unbeknown to anyone, Trent had made her into the woman she was, and his dabbling could very well be the reason he lay there now. She wanted nothing more than to solve this case, but to do so must risk exposing a secret she has fought endlessly to conceal.

With a great strong female lead bursting with personality you’ll find it easy to be swept up in a kick ass cybernetic mystery. J.D. Cunegan‘s Bounty is filled with suspense, action, and development. Police by day, vigilante superhero by night. A diverse plot with subplots carefully ingrained builds a brilliant setting and gives the world a fleshed out feel. A definite must read for Marvel/DC fans. It’s an enjoyable and engrossing read, with enough twists and intrigue for mystery fans, and enough sci-fi for lovers of the genre. A perfect combination in a dazzling read. 

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Book review: River Bones by Mary Deal (@Mary_Deal )

It had always been Sara’s dream to own a Victorian mansion and, although Talbot House reviewwas in need of some renovations, her dream had finally come true. Strange noises in the night left her on edge, but when she and her friend Daphine found fresh marks in the concrete where someone had tried to pry open the window Sara had to finally accept there was more to the noises than just her imagination. At her friend’s suggestion they went to visit Mrs Talbot, to learn more about the legend of the ghost walking the halls, if only to discover if these rumours had any truth. Sara, however, was less concerned about a ghost and more worried about a serial killer. She is obsessed with thoughts about this murderer at large, worse still, new evidence seems to suggest they came from Delta, a fact made more unnerving by the feeling that someone has their eye on her. Events that could once be dismissed as an over active imagination begin to escalate until there is no longer any room for doubt, Sara is not safe. Join the mystery and see if you can discover the killer’s identity in Mary Deal’s, River Bones: Sara Mason Mysteries Book One.

Mary Deal seamlessly integrates Sara’s history and character building into the plot, by the time you each the end you know everything you could want to. Friendships are built and developed, whilst all the time a budding air of tension keeps the reader wondering what is happening, and dreading what is to come. There is a brilliant attention to detail, from describing the surroundings, to providing sensory images so you can almost feel the thick blanket of the fog, or the scent of the surroundings. This book really is a descriptive treasure and builds a fantastic image of Delta, its surroundings, and even the community. Fans of mystery will love how subtle clues are woven within the plot, and as with any good story the red herrings and twists will keep you guessing. River Bones is a great read, filled with intrigue, suspense, mystery and even romance, it is well written and easily one of the best mystery/suspense books I have read this year. Mary Deal clearly has a talent for this style of writing, and I look forward to seeing more books from her in the future.

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Book review: Sam’s Song by Hannah Howe

Enquiry Agent Samantha Smith was just scraping by, her office, like her life, refurbished 51sg5s9ebeland in desperate need of some TLC. Then along came Milton Vaughan-Urquhart who worked for multi-millionaire Derwena de Caro, a pop-star and diva with more than her own share of baggage. The most recent addition to the list, a stalker. Derwena demanded a female private eye, with a shortage of those meeting the description, and the brilliant reputation Sam has been working to secure, she was the logical choice. But the case is not the only problem she has to contend with. Dan, her abusive ex-husband returns to the scene, and then there was the interest shown in her by Dr Alan Storey, her client’s psychiatrist, but is his interest anything more than professional, or can he see the deep rooted trauma from her life?

Sam’s Song follows a week in the life of Enquiry Agent Samantha Smith, and what a week it was, murder, mayhem, and the return of an abusive spouse. From the first page I couldn’t help drawing some parallels to the old Dick Tracy books, not so much in the style of narrative, but the vibe was certainly there. This book is character driven, and as such you will find an array of interesting people, all with distinctive personalities, but strongest of all is our mild mannered protagonist, who seems to be the only one unable to see her own value.
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Book review: The Borman Factor by Robert Lalonde

It all started with the murder of investigative reporter Terry Reynolds. The local police wp-1485106851329.jpgwanted to chalk it down to a mugging, but Stan Novak isn’t convinced. He thinks there is more to this than it was made to appear, but pressure from the mayor sees the investigation ruled a mugging gone wrong. It is election year after all. Nick Borman investigates industrial espionage for a living, but after a conversation with Bill Piermont, an old friend of his and the father of Terry’s wife, he willingly accepts the case. He expected to investigate a simple murder, his gut had warned him it wouldn’t be a fun ride, and boy was it right. Borman uncovers a trail of bribes and underhanded deals, and now must follow the money to uncover the truth behind Terry’s murder.

Robert Lalonde’s The Borman Factor is an action packed, investigative thriller filled with deceit and corruption. The scene is well set, and the alternating narrative between third and first person flows really well. Being well-paced, this book is sure to appeal to lovers of the genre, and written in such an accessible manner that people reading out of their genre will find themselves following along effortlessly. A strong debut novel for the character of Nick Borman.

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Book review: In the Wake of Death by Billy McLaughlin

Marc awoke, haunted by nightmares, suffering from some short-term memory loss and 4160ofv86wlduring the first stages of his recovery was unable to retain his new memories. He has been told events, as they were understood, countless times, but he failed to recall the events as they were described, in fact, his version of what happened far differs from that he is being told. But he is certain of one thing, he was with his partner Joel. His estranged sister Margo has been watching over him, fighting to find the means to pay his bills. Marc asks constantly about Joel, his fate, but he has not visited him once in all the time he was at the hospital, and Marc’s home shows no signs there was anyone living with him, and most confusing no sign of anyone called Joel being in his life. What there is, however, is a steady stream of cash withdrawals from Marc’s life long saving account in the time leading up to his ‘accident’. As Marc begins to recover he starts to piece together events from before his brush with death, and soon wonders if surviving was a blessing, or a curse.
Billy McLaighlin’s In the Wake of Death is a riveting read filled with dark thoughts, twists, and confusion as the character tries to piece together events before his accident. The characters are deep, well conceived, and all flawed in their own manner. The style of writing is beautifully descriptive with excellent scene setting. I can see myself purchasing more books from this author in the future.
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In the Wake of Death
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Book review: The Game of Sexes by Opal K. Dante

The Game of Sexes by Opal K. Dante is a thrilling combination of the action adventure genre and erotic romance.

gosEvie is a twenty year old virgin, almost freshly released from the all-girl boarding school her mother banished her to at the earliest possibility. But now she is home once more, and her obsession with her step-father Sebastian has only grown stronger. He has been married to her mother for just over five years and his affections towards his wife are strained at best. At every opportunity he leaves for Singapore, and the way he looks at Evie speaks of his own repressed desire. She vows to do anything to have him and very soon the opportunity presents itself, leading her into more danger and discovery than she could ever have imagined.

Sex, scandal, murder, action, adventure, mysteries and secrets The Games of Sexes has it all. This is not your typical erotic romance, it is an action packed adventure with peril, danger and surprising twists you won’t see coming. The plot is strong and compelling, the characters interesting, unique, well-developed and bursting with personality. The author’s style is immersive and more than once I found myself chuckling at some of the more humorous events. This book really is an amazing and surprising read and the erotic scene serve to enhance the story, not consume it. I look forward to reading more work of Opal K Dante’s in the future.

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The Games of the Sexes

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Book review: Grind by Edward Vukovic

Grind by Edward Vukovic  is a fiction novel touching on aspects of romance, mystery, and 51WEaAAHa2L._SS300_occult. However the main focus of Grind is the effect people unknowingly have on other people’s lives. It follows Ziva, Michel, Simon, Isaac, and Danielle. Five strangers whose paths cross and alter the course of another’s future.

Ziva was raised to read coffee, her skills taught to her by her baba (Grandmother.) whose skills were sought far and wide by those wishing to learn of the future. Ziva understands all too well people do not always want to hear what they are foretold, yet she speaks the truth, whether they accept it is another matter. Ziva avoids reading for herself, but to know the future is tempting, and an urge she could no longer resist. Continue reading “Book review: Grind by Edward Vukovic”

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Book Review: Fairfield’s Auction: A Witherston Murder Mystery by Betty Jean Craige

Fairfield’s Auction: A Witherston Murder Mystery by Betty Jean Craige is a murder mystery set in the town of Witherson. All is not well in the town of Witherston. Long ago the indexCherokees were cast from their land, their belongings claimed by the white man, and now they are being auctioned off as treasure for thousands, lining the pockets of the rich whilst the Cherokees are left unable to reclaim their heritage. Fairfield’s auction is such an event, countless treasures sold to the highest bidder, and those who protest and request respect for their own history, such as the Cherokees living in Tayanita village (known as Free rooster to the locals), are cast out. So many weapons, from tomahawks to a blowgun, but the final item certainly raised a few eyebrows, a live African Grey parrot by the name of Doolittle. Stressed and unloved, sealed in a small cage he finds himself sold like property to one of the only people present who believes animals too have souls, Dr Charlotte (Lottie) Byrd and this parrot can talk, its Continue reading “Book Review: Fairfield’s Auction: A Witherston Murder Mystery by Betty Jean Craige”