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Book review: Game Six – Judy Bruce

When her mother is caught in the crossfire of murder Brit suffers an endless stream of reviewnightmares. In a blink, she has lost her best friend, her home, everything. But she is not one to sit and lose herself to grief, not when there are answers to find and someone to be held accountable. It is amazing what secrets you uncover when given a motive look. Grudges seem abundant, but something uncovered suggests maybe, just maybe, the real target was not among the dead. With the help of her closest friend, Liz, and the handsome police detective, Brit vows to bring this killer to justice, but whether it will be delivered by her hand or the law’s has yet to be decided.

Judy Bruce’s Game Six focuses on Brit’s life in the wake of tragedy. She is a strong character who will let nothing stand in her way in finding the truth. Judy Bruce focuses a first-person narrative tell style of writing switching to the occasional third party perspective when focusing on things outside of the character’s knowledge. There are some good ideas, along with a few red herrings. Unlike this author’s Wind series there isn’t really much in the way of hidden clues for a reader to follow in order to conclude who is responsible, mainly due to the nature of investigation making such revelations impossible without spending a great deal of time on the involved characters’ histories. This is less of a who-done-it and more of an investigative drama. Liz and David make a good supporting cast in an enjoyable and unique tale. Heartbreak, gumption, moxie, and persistence drive the characters and the plot forward to its final and gripping conclusion. I must confess to having a special place for Liz in my heart, she is well-conceived and does wonders to cast a new light on people on the spectrum that those standing in judgement of their more difficult behaviour would overlook. I look forward to more from this collection of characters. I give Game Six a solid 4.5 stars.

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Book review: D.M. Barr’s Slashing Mona Lisa (@AuthorDMBarr )

Camarin Torres, investigative journalist. Or at least that was the dream. She wanted to reviewmake a difference, be a champion for the underdog, and yet with university just a few weeks from over, she was the only person without a job lined up. That was until fate intervened with an unexpected encounter. But still, she had a vision of her future, and Trend, the guilt pumping, judgemental, you are how you look, magazine was so far from who she was and what she stood for. But it was a job, and the new owner seemed intent on remaking the image into something she could align herself with. In her own time she works on her story, the Blubber Be Gone murder, determined to expose the killer and give them a voice, little does she know how dangerous a path she walks.

Slashing Mona Lisa is a well conceived, well constructed, murder mystery by D.M. Barr. Be prepared to be taken on an emotional journey of haters, shamers, and murder. You meet Camarin, and soon are rewarded with a deep insight into her character and motivations, the characters are as vivid as they are unique, from the cockney speaking Rachel, to the sassy room mates struggling to make rent. There is no end to the thrills in this book. The investigation is beautifully scripted, creating tension, danger and, with more and more bodies being discovered the deeper Camarin digs, urgency. This is one book you will not want to put down, you will find yourself wanting to see what happens next. Romance, love, danger, suspicions, murder, and mystery, all combined in one hell of a tale that also serves to make you more aware of the intolerances this world displays, and maybe, just maybe, realise the extent to which your own actions can affect others. A clear message in a gripping story.

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Book review: The Game of Sexes by Opal K. Dante

The Game of Sexes by Opal K. Dante is a thrilling combination of the action adventure genre and erotic romance.

gosEvie is a twenty year old virgin, almost freshly released from the all-girl boarding school her mother banished her to at the earliest possibility. But now she is home once more, and her obsession with her step-father Sebastian has only grown stronger. He has been married to her mother for just over five years and his affections towards his wife are strained at best. At every opportunity he leaves for Singapore, and the way he looks at Evie speaks of his own repressed desire. She vows to do anything to have him and very soon the opportunity presents itself, leading her into more danger and discovery than she could ever have imagined.

Sex, scandal, murder, action, adventure, mysteries and secrets The Games of Sexes has it all. This is not your typical erotic romance, it is an action packed adventure with peril, danger and surprising twists you won’t see coming. The plot is strong and compelling, the characters interesting, unique, well-developed and bursting with personality. The author’s style is immersive and more than once I found myself chuckling at some of the more humorous events. This book really is an amazing and surprising read and the erotic scene serve to enhance the story, not consume it. I look forward to reading more work of Opal K Dante’s in the future.

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The Games of the Sexes

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Book Review: Fairfield’s Auction: A Witherston Murder Mystery by Betty Jean Craige

Fairfield’s Auction: A Witherston Murder Mystery by Betty Jean Craige is a murder mystery set in the town of Witherson. All is not well in the town of Witherston. Long ago the indexCherokees were cast from their land, their belongings claimed by the white man, and now they are being auctioned off as treasure for thousands, lining the pockets of the rich whilst the Cherokees are left unable to reclaim their heritage. Fairfield’s auction is such an event, countless treasures sold to the highest bidder, and those who protest and request respect for their own history, such as the Cherokees living in Tayanita village (known as Free rooster to the locals), are cast out. So many weapons, from tomahawks to a blowgun, but the final item certainly raised a few eyebrows, a live African Grey parrot by the name of Doolittle. Stressed and unloved, sealed in a small cage he finds himself sold like property to one of the only people present who believes animals too have souls, Dr Charlotte (Lottie) Byrd and this parrot can talk, its Continue reading “Book Review: Fairfield’s Auction: A Witherston Murder Mystery by Betty Jean Craige”