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Book review: Mo Robinson – Game of Twins

Suzanne Delacroix was born to investigate homicide. She excelled through the ranks of the police force reviewby her own merit and was dubbed the Tigress. She had only been sick once before, during one horrific night at a frat party, but the triple murder of the Monroe twins and their mother brought that night back to the forefront of her mind. Her reaction was so intense she handed in her resignation and fled to the beach for some solitude. But she couldn’t stay away for long, the murder gnawed at her, and soon she finds herself drawn back, uncovering links and secrets she would have never imagined.

Mo Robinson brings lovers of murder, mystery and paranormal something to really sink their teeth into in their thrilling and enticing book, Game of Twins. With each chapter being clearly labelled with the date and correlation to critical events navigating a complex timeline spanning many years is made surprisingly easy. Packed with action, adventure, murder, sex, mystery, and a game spanning back decades. Mia and Suzanne make some brilliant lead characters, well developed and rounded they each find themselves pursuing the truth, a truth which leads them to unexpected revelations and their supporting cast not only enhance their characters, but bring their own something special to events, be it antagonism, doubt, difficulties, or support. There is so much to love about this book, from vivid scene setting, to the delicate threads of character plot, history, and settings woven throughout. This really is a well-rounded and tight story. From the very start to the final page you’ll find yourself gripped by this immersive and well-constructed story.

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Book review: Diane May – EVO (@DianeMayWriter )

Marchiori had seen more than his fair share of murders, in his job it was to be expected. reviewBut never before had he seen anything like this. With all the markings of a rapidly escalating serial killer time is of the essence. And with the latest turn, the killer himself has given them a deadline with a very clear threat against one of their own. The problem is, he never touches his victims, he leaves no evidence, except for the pen drive showing him killing in the most terrifying way, hypnosis. There is more to this than meets the eye, an entire thread of things way beyond his pay grade, secret experiments, dastardly research, and the most terrifying threat humanity has to face. Luckily he is not alone, but every second is one closer to the final toll for all but a few.

Diane May’s EVO possesses some amazingly developed, realistic, and deep characters enhancing the plot of this engrossing murder mystery. But this is not your simple who done it, an intricate web of lies, secrets, and experiments give the fascinating tale a supercharge. With a serial killer at large, mass genocide on the cards, and the CIA’s experimental children danger emanates from every page and I was hooked from the beginning, the vivid descriptions and portrayal of emotion are well crafted and flow seamlessly, feeding and stimulating the reader’s imaginations. Filled with complex relationships, doubts, secrets, agendas, lies, and dangerous revelations this is guaranteed not to leave you wanting in any area, a must read for lovers of the genre or those seeking something with a little more to offer.

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Read Sept 2018

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Book review: Michael Pronko – The Moving Blade (@pronkomichael )

Jamie hadn’t seen her father, Bernard Mattson, for years, they had drifted apart, but it reviewhad been about to change, they had planned to reunite, but then his murder put a stop to the plan. But murder is not the only thing she finds in his wake, a robbery on the day of his funeral suggests there may be more to the murder of the renowned diplomat. Jamie is eager to discover the truth about what befell her father, on the case is Detective Hiroshi Shimizu, along with his motley crew of ex-sumo wrestlers, rugby players, and Private investigators. With nothing but a wiped computer, stolen statues, and erotic prints it seems an impossible task. But the body count is rising and answers are demanded. Can they uncover the truth before more people fall to the blade?

Culturally rich and seductively compelling The Moving Blade is a must read for lover of murder mystery and crime fiction fans. Great attention to detail in both setting, lifestyle, and characters has been applied to create an atmospheric, tense, and engaging read which is further enhanced by Michael Pronko’s skilled narrative. Plots, protests, questions, and secrets fill the pages and drive the reader forward through the engaging and well constructed plot. The characters are rich, deep, and vibrant, each with their own very distinctive rules, personality, relationships, and objectives. I can honestly say I enjoyed every minute I spent reading this, and it gets something I save only for those special books I really connect with, my heartfelt recommendation. Whether you’re looking for a suspenseful and engaging read, or just something to pass the hours you should give The Moving Blade a try.

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I read this some time ago, but never published the review on my blog.

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Book review: The Case of the Tattooed Buttocks – Alan Hardy (@AlanWilliamHard )

When a blonde beauty arrives uninvited and expressing she has news only to be shared reviewin Cullot’s presence, you can bet it means trouble. Although murder probably wasn’t what most of the guests at oil magnate, Mr. Henry Barble’s, mansion were expecting. The details seem a little hazy, tattoos, underwear, no two stories seem to collaborate. Ex-inspector Cullot inserts himself directly into the investigation, taking point despite being considered a suspect himself. All too easily he falls back into his old rapport with his former side-kick, Detective Sergeant Watkin. But his presence is not a blessing to everyone. Something strange happened here, and it is down to them to uncover the truth behind The Case of the Tattooed Buttocks.

I have to admit, I wasn’t sure what to expect, Alan Hardy’s, The Case of the Tattooed Buttocks seemed as if it would be a fun read, and it was exactly that. There were some lines I couldn’t help but laugh at. Whilst it is a well-constructed murder mystery, complete with hints and clues, it is also filled with characters who are brimming with personality. Filled with humour, intrigue, and mystery that will keep you turning those pages while enjoying every moment.

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Book review: Murderous Intent by John L. Evans

Dimitri Kosloff, a famous film director, had been found stabbed and dismembered at his reviewusual Friday and Saturday night suite. He was as well known for his sexual preferences as he was for his Academy Awards, so his murder caused quite a stir. The evidence is circumstantial but points towards a young sailor, Richard Dellesandro, who was the last person seen alive with him as he accompanied the director to his room. With such a high profile case, it is essential to make quick work of it, but not everyone thinks Dellesandro is their man. However, with nothing to place their other possible suspect at the scenes, can justice be done and the truth be uncovered, or will someone get away with murder?

Murderous Intent is a murder/crime mystery set in Los Angeles, and focusing on the more famous aspects, such as Hollywood. John L. Evans writes with a good poise for the genre and it is easy to lose yourself in this book and read it in a single sitting. There are so many important events that occur and you wonder whether the Los Angeles Police, who are reluctant to drop the case, will be able to not only get their perp, but prove their involvement, or is it simply too high exposure to continue when a fall guy has already been found? The hunt is on, secrets are uncovered, lies are exposed, and red tape threatens the investigation at every turn. Speaking of every turn, you’ll find yourself turning the pages eagerly, gripped and engrossed by not only the intricately woven plot, but the immersive style with which the author engages you.

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Book review: Diana J Febry – Twisted Truth (@DianaJFebry )

Another boring fluff piece for the local rag put Megan on the trail of the story of a reviewlifetime, or at least that was the promise. The idea was to rejuvenate the image of a nursing home, but the staff weren’t the only ones to know of her upcoming visit. Through deception and carefully planned timing, suggestions of foul play are handed to her. Implications of a covered up crime involving people of such standing that the messenger feared there were few places he could turn. The seed of corruption runs deep, and there are those who would do anything to keep their secrets buried. Megan is determined to uncover the truth, but she’s going to need help, not only to uncover the mystery, but also to stay alive.

Twisted Truth by Diana J Febry is a gripping murder mystery that will keep you on your toes. Subplots and events really add to the feel you are part of the setting. Diversions, red herrings, hints, cover ups, and fabricated reports all add to the engagement, drawing you in, making you want to piece together what really happened, is everything as it seems, an innocent accident, or is someone covering up the truth for their own gains? And if so, what exactly are they hiding. Well written, captivating , with well-developed characters, this is a murder mystery you won’t soon forget.

available on Kindle Unlimited

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Book review: Sam Knupp – Smoke on the Mountains

Pepper Anne Wright knew all too well the importance of being a doggy mummy, reviewespecially after last time, so when Rufus didn’t come when she called she left in search of him. She didn’t think of the danger, just preventing her father’s tears. Little did she know her actions that day would cause him more pain than she could have imagined. It is nearly Christmas, and when she doesn’t come hope people begin to worry. Authorities attempt to find her, hoping against hope  that she is alive. But we know the truth, Pepper Anne has been murdered, and the hunt is about to begin to find the killer.

Sam Knupp’s Smoke on the Mountains is written with an engaging narrative filled with location appropriate colloquialisms that nurtures an authentic feel to the work. It is intelligently planned and written, with an insertion of humour in places that put me in mind of Douglas Adams. The characters are complex and developed just like setting. Sam Knupp clearly likes his idioms, and there are certainly no shortage of interesting ones, some set scenes, others moods. Every chapter starts with a title which acts to clarify timeline, and a thought, then ends on a ‘wisdom says’ note that put me in mind of daytime TVs final thoughts or thought of the day, but were related to the chapter being read. It is well paced with attention to detail, and enough suggestion and deception to point a finger, only for you to be surprised. I particularly enjoyed how the town and characters were built, and the after word at the end which goes on to tell you about the characters and what happened next. The almost poetic and contemplative  style of writing may not appeal to everyone, but the good plot, characters, and development will keep a reader entertained for hours.

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Book review: Ginny Fite’s Lying, Cheating, & Occasionally Murder(@unwrinkledbrain )

Charlotte had a lot to prove. Especially to her father who thought she would always be, reviewlike her mother, second rate in her profession-or at least she was in his eyes. Often she had fantasised about shoving her ground breaking research down his throat, literally. She was comfortable, lived in a nice house with her husband, Harold, had lovers on the side, and always got what she wanted. She had thought the complex ties of her work were beyond the understanding of her husband, but he had seen something that had changed their relationship forever. But was it something to kill over? Her husband’s car is found ploughed into a building, two bullets piercing his head, suspicion falls to her, and soon people are pawing over her life with a fine toothed comb. Is she capable of murder, or is there another secret hiding behind her husband’s demise?

Lying, Cheating, & Occasionally Murder is a well planned, well conceived murder mystery, with characters that you will enjoy to learn more about as the plot progresses. Ginny Fite litters the plot with subtleties designed to both guide and mislead the reader to the ultimate conclusion. As a fan of murder mysteries I found this to be one book I had a hard time putting down, there is so much attention to detail that you’re not reading the story, you’re living it, trying to piece together events before the final revelation. As the title suggests lies, cheating, and murder are woven into the plot, and the author’s style of backtracking to previous events in order to paint a fuller picture of both characters and circumstances is impeccably executed. I’ll certainly be keeping an eye open for more work by Ginny Fite, and it’ll certainly win the hearts of lovers of the genre.

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Book review: Judy Bruce’s Lies in the Wind

Megan knew there was something wrong before Celeste even walked through her doors. reviewShe could feel the malevolence, the evil, in the air. She knew something was coming, but not what. When Megan finds herself involved in what was about to be passed off as a murder suicide she had no idea how deeply she’d be drawn into things. She was already the executor of this family’s will, and found herself drawn to their autistic son, Mitch, who reminded her so much of her own child. Determined to find answers, she pursues her own investigation, unaware exactly how life changing this particular case will be. Join the search, follow the clues, in Judy Bruce’s Lies in the Wind, Wind Series Book 5.

From the very first page Judy Bruce’s Lies in the Wind, Wind Series Book 5 will have you enraptured. Quick to start with a momentum that just keeps building. Judy Bruce provides everything the reader needs to piece together the clues and follow the breadcrumbs, so pay attention as you’re reading and you’ll find yourself solving the case along side Megan. I found the characters to be very real, complex and well developed with a continuous growth throughout the book. As a parent of a child on the spectrum I found the sensitivity used to deal with Mitch, and the attention to small details to be refreshing, and this same attention to detail is skilfully woven into the plot. If you love a good murder mystery, Lies in the Wind certain ranks among the top of those I have read. There is everything you would expect from the genre, as well as some great character focused areas. Murder, mystery, family feuds, relationships, red herrings, and a just a skittering of the paranormal, it’s a recipe for a perfect read.

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Lies in the Wind

 

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Book review: Who Killed Vivien Morse by Diana J Febry

Who killed Vivien Morse is a murder mystery by Diana J Febry.
Vivien Morse was a social worker,  looking after the down and outs, rejects and 519ae5multroublemakers. She never could ignore a good sob story,  and perhaps that is what got her killed.  Prior to moving to Sapperton she paid frequent visits to prisoners, whilst suffering the fist of her own jealous husband.  Now she has been found murdered and there seems to be no shortage of potential suspects. It is up to DCI Hatherall to dig through Vivien’s past in order to piece together the truth about this woman’s life,  and in doing so, hopefully discover not only her murderer, but their motives.
If you’re looking for a murder mystery with plenty of twists and a cast of interesting, eccentric, and well-developed characters this is certainly not a title to be overlooked. Whilst it is the fourth book in the DCI Hatherall series no knowledge of previous tales is needed, but I warn you, the plot is so carefully conceived that you’ll find yourself wanting to purchase more of Diana J Febry’s work. It was an enjoyable murder mystery, with an array of characters that will stay in a readers’ mind for some time after.
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