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Book review: Robert E Kreig’s The Shadow Of Woodmyst (@robertekreig )

Alice Gyfford, Kayl’sro of the Agrodien, and a daughter of Woodmyst, was young, reviewsomeone a person would hardly believe was capable of the feats she had already accomplished. She had more blood on her hands than even the most seasoned warriors. She had protected her homeland, regardless of the cost. Now she turns her focus to rectifying the wrongs of those who were in the position of power before her. It started as a simple gesture to open conversation, the return of property previously stolen, but where it would lead she could not imagine, and the new loyal ally that had chosen her as its keeper was beyond belief, but she will need all the help she can get, there is a prophecy that speaks if the rise of a magi, a warlock, and the time has come for all to learn their place. Join the adventure in Robert E Kreig’s The Shadow Of Woodmyst, The Woodmyst Chronicles Book VI

Robert E Kreig has woven yet another captivating tale in the Woodmyst Chronicles. There is danger, strife, challenges, rising threat, new allies, and ancient enemies, not to mention a fantastic cast of well developed characters who enhance the plot alongside the protagonist, Alice. Alice is a remarkable character, whilst young she is both strong and experienced with a will and passion to do what is right, while also looking after those she protects. I first met her in the previous book, and she continues to grow and surprise me in this one. From the last book to this one, the characters aren’t the only thing to develop and progress Robert E Kreig as an author continues to hone their already impressive craft in The Shadow Of Woodmyst. Vivid descriptions conjure magnificent scenes that come to life before your eyes and weave their own spell of magic over you as a reader  and won’t fail to keep you entertained for hours.

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Book review: The Desert Botanist by Jennifer Stone (@JenStone4485 )

Erica had agreed to leave behind her luscious homeland as part of a cultural exchange reviewand learning experience with the desert dwellers. She was excited at the thought of learning what new plants and remedies could be revealed in their harsh climate. She had not expected everything she had witnessed, even Amira’s own attitude, to have been nothing but a deception. What she finds is not the city of cultural wealth and learning she hoped, but a land of debauchery and corruption, where people paraded like peacocks displaying their wealth and only those with riches were worthy of attention. Erica must quickly learn who she can trust, one wrong turn could destroy her, and there are those who would seek to do just that. She must have faith, for a storm is coming, one that will change the very future, and Erica has her own role to play in what will come to pass.

Having read the Earthen Priestess I was really looking forward to The Desert Botanist, and the author did not disappoint. I really enjoy the easy, flowing style of Jennifer Stone, it draws the reader in with its enjoyable characters, whilst finding the perfect balance of description to allow the reader’s imagination some creative license. A wonderful book and an enjoyable read.

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Book review: O.Z Diggs Himself Out by Ron Baxley Jr. (@RonBaxleyJRofOz )

O.Z. Diggs the seventh, descendent of Oz the Great and Terrible Wizard, like all male reviewheirs in his family, was cursed by the wicked witch of the West. Or so the story which had been passed through many generations had been told. He was the storyteller now, and the last of his line, fated by the witch’s curse to never produce an heir. But he does think he has found a way out. In order to break the curse and thus allow himself and his family to return to Oz, he must be recognised as a descendent of his distant relative. Things seem to be in motion, he has come across one of the magical staffs owned by Oz, and through it he received a message about a band of good wizards and witches that were cast also from Oz. They call themselves the Society of the Walking Cane, and he is certain they can help him. But as is always the case, there are those of good, and those of evil, and those of evil will stop at nothing to ensure the witch’s curse remains in place. Can he break the curse, or is he fated to be the end of his line, find out in Ron Baxley, Jr’s O.Z. Diggs Himself Out.

O.Z. Diggs himself out is a spin off of the popular Wizard of Oz, focusing around the distant descendants of the original Wizard, and a curse bestowed upon his line. Ron Baxley, Jr. writes in an imaginative first person perspective style which along side a serious plot has elements of humour, and darker humour to it. As stated in the book, the lines between the real adventure, and that immortalised through the story have been altered, this allows Ron Baxley, Jr. to take something familiar and turns it to their own devises. There is a lot to like about this story, adventure, scene building, it definitely fits quite nicely into the fantasy genre, and will appeal to that audience. Imaginative, fun, and enjoyable O.Z. Diggs Himself Out makes for an entertaining read whether you’re a fan of the Wizard of Oz or not.

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O.Z. Diggs Himself Out

 

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Book review: Lady Saera’s The Wizard of Crescent Keep

It all started at a curiosity shop, where curiosity really did get the better of Christopher reviewEnglish. He found an old chest, locked, sealed, and seemingly empty. He knew he had to have it, to find a way to open it and discover what was hidden inside. They say curiosity killed the cat, in this case it killed the boy, or at least made it so he could no longer be who he once was. For all intents and purposes he was dead. Whisked away to another world, Chris became a thing of the past, and Crescent was born. Years pass, with no way to return home he is schooled in magic and adapts and excels in the new world. But something is amiss. A sorcerer called Minger claims to have a cure for vampirism. Crescent has had suspicions about this figure for some time, strange deaths and bizarre happenings follow him. Crescent is finally in reach of an answer, close to the evidence he needs to stop this villain, unaware his investigation has left someone he cares about vulnerable, or the debt he is about to incur.

The Wizard of Crescent Keep Special Color Edition Book One (Volume 1) is a fantasy novel written by Lady Saera. She possesses an enjoyable narrative, a style which is simple, yet engaging, something that would easily appeal to the young adult audience and tells a tale of magic, romance, and villainy that, like many aspects of the books, is straight from a fairy tale. Disney meets the original Brother’s Grimm in the darker side of fantasy, where murderous and scheming villains manipulate and exploit naïve maidens for their own amusement and gains. The characters are interesting, I really liked the poor Sir Raven Knight, something about the poor cursed bird tugged the heart strings. I thought the map near the start of the book was a brilliant addition, as were some of the illustrations included, they really added a touch of something extra in a beautifully presented book. The Wizard of Crescent Keep is an easy, enjoyable read, that you will easily lose hours to.

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Book review: T.L. Howard’s The Final Choosing

It had taken his last moments in this world, but he recorded the truth. Perhaps his record reviewwould be the only copy of what had been done, and in turn what he had done. Evidence, scriptures, it all was to be destroyed so no one would almost destroy the world itself in an attempt to fulfil a prophecy. The Abbot had thought only his predecessor could open the spell which bound it and learn the truth. He had been mistaken. Faldyn, returned from the dead by unnatural means, has discovered a trail, notes leading to clues, leading to the prophecy, and he intends to exploit what he has learnt, but doing so will result in the world being torn from existence as if it had never existed. There was a prophecy, but he was not the one chosen to fulfil it, and any seeking to use it but the one selected will bring about the end.

The Final Choosing by T.L. Howard is a steady paced fantasy, building slow momentum through the journey of two opposing forces, Faldyn, who seeks to fulfil the prophecy and name one true god, and Mirah, the one approached by the divine themselves in hope to stop him. Port to port, town to city, winter to spring, you will be awed by the magnificent descriptions, crafted in such a way to conjure spellbinding scenes. The characters are as deep as they are diverse They are well-rounded, developed, and show great growth throughout their journeys. Watching Mirah try to make sense of the false trails, red herrings, and deceptions, whilst attempting to solve the cryptic riddle and understand exactly what she is trying to prevent is masterfully done. We watch and are told the reasons behind Faldyn’s misdirection, at each turn we know what must be done, and will her to realise the deception. This is a plot you cant help become invested in, and a journey you will most certainly enjoy.

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Book review: Richard Nell’s Kings of Paradise (@rnell2 )

His mother had given everything she had to protect him. Born Noss touched there were reviewthose who would call Ruka cursed. Children like him were not allowed to live in some places, although some northern laws protected them from the death sentence that people were all too willing to preach was right. She loved him, she believed he was a child of prophecy, one who would destroy and create the world anew. Ruka however believed no such things. He lacked his mother’s faith in the gods, and sought only to live. But he was an outlaw, unjustly accused and unfairly sentenced. He vowed to survive, to live on for his mother. He took everything that was good and buried it in a haven of his own making, a place he could be all he wished, a place where things in the real world didn’t matter. Except they did. While he tries to survive, a young Prince tries to find his place within the world. Sent to the navy, unsure of his calling he finds comradery and earns the respect of many. Before both these men lies a difficult future, one that will either save the world or see it burn.

There a complex depth to the characters in  Richard Nell ‘s Kings of Paradise (Ash and Sand Book 1)  I enjoyed watching each of their developments, Dala, Kale, and Ruka have very different stories, different lives, and yet all three are destined to change the world. I loved how these characters grew and changed when challenged by circumstances. Weakness become strength, and the power and strength of an idea is central to this story. Written with a flair fitting to the world of fantasy, and a passion  the reader can’t help but experience. There is so much depth to plot, characters, world building,  hierarchy, you can’t help but be drawn into this world of darkness, entitlement, and hatred. Sometimes things must be destroyed to be built anew, a theme explored this impressive tale. Love, betrayal,  loyalty, honour, and sacrifice, God’s and men, agendas, politics, and manipulation, what more could you ask for? A must for lovers of fantasy, especially those who enjoy losing themselves in a epic tale.

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Book review: Holland C Kirbo’s A Flame in the Night

The birth of her sister’s child stirred a gift Laykyn had never imagined. All it took was one touch reviewof the newborn and she had a vision, one of fire and violence. A dangerous force sought the child, but why any would wish to harm a baby was beyond her. Then there were the dreams, a similar theme of fire, but his time it was she who was trapped, at first by her own fear, and then by a man who barred her path. Her mother suggested, perhaps, given how long she had had them there was something divine in their nature, something that needed to be understood, how right she was. Unbeknown to Laykyn the world is changing, dark forces have awoken in the west, and most of Theranyn has fallen to Maal, the ruler of Hael who wishes to force himself into physical form and take their world for his own. Her nephew’s birth was a thing of significance, a catalyst, but not in the way any had expected.

Holland C Kirbo has an excellent writing style filled with rich and beautifully descriptive narrative, fantastic world building, and an array of unique and interesting characters forged into their own person by their unique experiences. There was no choice but to be drawn into the fabulous world, and marvel at all within. Rich histories, myths, and attention to detail have all been woven to create this amazing tale, and since A Flame in the Night is the first book in The Legends of Aewyr series it shows fantastic promise for the rest of the series. This book really made it easy to get excited about fantasy, I loved the complexes, the characters and the obvious thought and scope that has clearly gone into its writing. I am looking forward to book two.

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Book review: Wilbert Stanton’s Gears of Fate (@wilbert_stanton )

Zak Walker, a fringe rat living on the outskirts of the slums and doing dangerous labour reviewin the hope to look after his sister, could never imagine the plan fate has for him. He only wanted to protect his sister. His father, since their mother left, is a mean and violent drunk, and Zak had sworn to look after Alice. But the distance he would go to keep this vow would surprise even him. The day Seneca appeared was the start of his twisted path. His sister vanishes, spirited away to Earth, a place now abandoned by the gods and left to the Fey. Zak must unite the gods, but to do so he must pull Zeus from his fractured state by retrieving something stolen from him by his treacherous son, Ares. Earth is not like it was in the time of the gods, now it is nothing more than a hunting ground of rivalry and survival, a honey trap, pretty, but deadly to those who don’t know how to look after themselves. Can Zak survive in a place where trust can be a death sentence, and keep his promise to protect his sister? Find out in Gears of Fate, Forgotten God’s, book one, by Wilbert Stanton.

Gears of Fate put me in mind of Piercy Jackson meets the Golden compass and Disney’s treasure island. There’s a steampunk element that I found charming. Seneca’s character reminded me of one of my favourite characters from Tales of Vesperia. As a gamer and fantasy lover, not to mention a lover of Greek gods and mythos this book ticked a lot of my boxes. Well written, engrossing, Imaginative, gripping, and fun. You’ll find yourself lost in a world of dangers, where nothing is quite what it appears. Wilbert Stanton has a talent for world building and character development and creates believable relationships, technologies, adaptations, and content fleshing out an amazing world. A great start to what promises to be a gripping series.

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Book review: Kate L. Mary’s The Outliers (@kmary0622 )

Indra was an Outlier. She was nothing, less than nothing within the city walls. For three reviewyears she had worked for Saffron, inheriting her mother’s position of House Maid when her mother became too sick to work. Now it fell to her to provide for the family. She learnt quickly how to protect herself from the more horrific consequences, and in turn when her best friend Mira came to work there, she protected her, even at her own risk. Things were less than ideal, but they were bearable for the small wages and food they were paid. What they were given often meant the difference between life and death. But things were changing, and following events Indra feels somewhat responsible for, bills that had previously failed are being passed to ensure the Outliers are closer to becoming slaves than the free people they were, what’s more, part of it was being done ‘for their own good’. Indra doesn’t know what to do, this latest change will force her to sacrifice the very reason she works there, but there is no life beyond the wastelands, despite how her husband indulges in such fantasies. Could she risk trying to survive, or is the slow push into slavery her only chance?

I really enjoyed Kate L. Mary’s The Outliers. Indra is an easy character to relate to, she’s an overthinker. She replays things in her mind, and shoulders the burden of things she felt she could have changed. She carries with her guilt and remorse, and through it all strives to do right as much as she dare, even at the risk of punishment. But there are some boundaries she knows better than to push, and things that, to her own pain, she keeps from Bodhi, her husband, and Asa is one such secret, despite the seemingly innocent nature of their forming relationship. I found her Bodhi’s character really likable, especially in his attempts to help his wife grow and learn things that their way of life would normally frown upon. I found Kate L. Mary’s writing style to be immersive, enough description to build her world and environments and enough character interactions and observations to get a real feel for the conflicts, hierarchy, and structure of the world they live in. It is certainly a strong first book, and I’ll be keeping my eyes open for the next instalment.

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Book review: Anthea Sharp’s Spark: Feyguard Book 1

Spark Jaxley was a professional gamer, and boy did she draw in the crowds. With the reviewupcoming release of FullD and the awesome game Feyland, her schedule was more hectic than ever. The last thing she needed was to cross paths with a Hacker, intent of finding the cheats and selling them before the game was released. Feyland had a secret, it was interfaced with the real land of the fey. So strong was the foundation of the game that it had once drawn beings form that realm through, and a crack remained, with one perfect exploit the barrier separating the game world and the Dark Court could be torn asunder, and who better to find such a cheat than a hacker? Aran did not know what he was getting himself into, and Spark’s attachment to the gaming world goes deeper than any would imagine, she is part of the Feyguard, an elite force of seven charged with returning those mortals who stray to far into the game and end up in a place they should not tread, and now she must risk her life to pull him back to their world, before the fey can utilise his skills to their advantage.

This is a brilliant read. Whilst it is book one in the series Anthea Sharp does an excellent job in creating epic events that preceding the story, without having to actually recap. A nice touch which adds depth and reality to the characters. As a gamer myself I loved in in game applications, the skills, and abilities possessed within Feyland. There had clearly gone a lot of thought into how best to write parts of a game as a book, something which if often lost in transition, but not here. As a reader you will find yourself turning page after page watching the growing relationships, the friendships, companionships, even the adversaries, all developing and escalating. Spark is a brilliant female lead, and is well supported by Aran as a secondary character. Great storytelling, with a fun enjoyable plot.

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