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Book review: Destination: Unknown – Joey Paul (@MsJoeyBug)

Harriet’s life was anything but normal. Since her mum’s diagnosis, life had changed. Her reviewhome, her responsibilities, and her school, everything was different. She was a student, a carer, and now, it seemed, a time traveller. It happened early one morning, a ghost appeared and beseeched her aid. Back in the 1900s her father had been accused of murder, and whilst their family had no concerns for money, a guilty verdict would ruin them, driving them into poverty and shame. Of course, they were born at different times, so how was Harriet supposed to clear the name of someone already long dead, and change events already dictated by time’s hand? Time travel of course.

I have read a large number of Joey Paul’s books. There is just something about her first-person narrative I find captivating. Destination Unknown is my most recent acquisition and there are a lot of things about this book to love. There is an attention to detail in regards to how a carer feel, the toll on them, their fears, concerns, and the worries that shape every thought, every day. I found this added a lot of depth to the characters and plot, and easily built up an understanding and empathy that those not having been in a situation like Harriet’s would not even consider. The same focus has been applied in reflecting the 1900s, even down to mannerisms. I enjoyed watching the pieces fit together as the plot goes on, and the formation of bonds, friendships, and understanding.

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Book review: TK Rising – Pink House (@etkrising )

Daniel had two parts to him, there was the boy everyone saw, and then another part of reviewhim, a part he shoved away and disassociated himself with for so long. That part of him was a murderer, and it was with that part of him the thing that came tearing into his closet one night resonated with. Its name was Phearus, it had been damaged, its memories were unclear, and it was hunting the worst of man to feed to the thing hunting it through the tear. Just as Daniel resonated with it, it in turn became part if him, and in time Daniel sought to feed that lost part of him, drawing him closer to Phearus who has long been absent from the cupboard in the pink house. Just as Phearus is starting to think of Daniel as his son, he was torn from 1981 into the future of another dimension, and he will do whatever it takes to get back to him before history says he disappeared.

Fictional historical meets futuristic sci-fi all rolled into the timeline of a single being, that is precisely what you’ll get if you pick up TK Rising’s Pink House. Gods, turf wars, human meddling, primitive natures, and of course, the hunt. The book follows two main plotlines, the first of Daniel, a boy turned serial killer, and the second of Phearus Elconn, son of Godriel Elconn and heir to the greatest house on Alta. There are some tense situations, and times where you really don’t know who to root for. This character-driven plot will push you to the edge of your seat with some of the atmospheric and gripping scenes you’ll encounter. Horror, time travel, gods, and mortals all wrapped in a tightly woven story filled with its own unique complexities. It is the  third book of the Blue Star series but information about the multi-verses, territory control and events are explained at the front to allow to the reader to simply pick up the book and enjoy.

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Book review: A Shadow in Doubt by Roari Benjamin

A Shadow in Doubt is a time travel, Sci-fi written by  Roari Benjamin

Samantha Marquet, or Sam as she is generally known, has a decision to make. One which 51-qu9kwtblcould shape the very future itself. An alarming thought given the fact her actions need to preserve the timeline, not alter it. As the protector of the Flamella tree she holds the secret to life itself and control over the Society, those carefully selected to be offered time immemorial. Her current self had been exposed into the Society long before she should have, and all must be done to prevent contamination. Some people however have other plans. Travellers sent back to kill or control her, the BOAs, people of this time whose time line cannot risk being altered, seek the philosopher’s stone and those who hold it. Whilst forming plans and trying to pre-empt and counter their attempts against her and the Society, she must also make a choice. Bailey her boyfriend, could be the enemy, aligned with one faction or another. Then again, he could also be the future she was intended to embrace had Michael not prematurely entered her life. She must keep Bailey close, learn his motives and hope whatever she chooses is the path she was intended to take. Should she allow herself to be lost in her love for Michael, or wait and see what could be with Bailey? Time will, literally, tell.

I really enjoyed the complex characters and story of this book. My one wish is that I had picked up number one first. Whilst it can be enjoyed in its own right there are a few places where reading the first book would have been of benefit. The author has a wonderful style and seems to effortless craft an entertaining tale filled with the complexities of time travel. Secret societies, questioned loyalties, love, and betrayal, what more could you want?

Book link:

A Shadow in Doubt

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Book review: Echoes of the Past (The Lobster Cove Series) by Emma Kaye

Echoes of the Past (The Lobster Cove Series) is a magic realism, time travel, romantic novella by Emma Kaye

Isabeau was born and raised in Lobster Cove, only not like everyone else. In 1962 she was 51lp-hw7relaccused of witchcraft and was burnt at the stake, or that had been the town’s intention. Desperate to avoid her fate Isabeau cast a spell, one intended to set her free. But spells of such magnitude are difficult. Instead of finding herself no longer with Lobster Cove’s borders she find herself trapped within them, the only difference, the year. She soon discovers attempting to leave the town results in her being thrown through through time once more. Fifteen years have past and understanding the rules of her imprisonment Isabeau has managed to build a home for herself and adopts a dog to fill the void she feels within her life. Then along comes Grayson Wright, the nephew of the only person Isabeau has ever trusted with her secret, and it seems he is set on exposing whatever she is hiding, only it isn’t what he thinks it to be.

Emma Kaye has a wonderful writing style. While I read a lot there are only a few styles that will completely captivate me in this manner. I was hooked from the first page and lost in Isabeau’s story. One thing I really appreciated was the fact the author didn’t make the time travel or witchcraft all consuming. Like everything in life it has an impact on the character, it is part of their identity, but it doesn’t rule their every waking moment. This is a love story, and a well crafted one at that. I thought the characters were brilliant, and this story has made me keen to read more work from Emma Kaye.

 

Book link

Echoes of the Past

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Book review: Hegira by Jim Cronin

Hegira by Jim Cronin is a Dystopian, Time-travel, science fiction centring around the indexprotagonists Karm, and his involvement with Maripa and Doctor Jontar Rocket. Karm was sent back in time with a very specific agenda, to prevent the extinction of the Brin, the only hope the universe has to overcome the current threat. Armed with carefully selected information regarding the past he is sent to the planet in order to develop the means to keep his people from extinction, without causing too much damage to the timeline. But his mission is not without obstacles, his allies begin to question him, trust wavers and with the rising or The Faith and their collaboration to control all which is Karm’s, if he is to succeed he needs to stay ahead of their schemes.

I have to say I really enjoyed reading this book, it not only Continue reading “Book review: Hegira by Jim Cronin”