author, book review, reading, writing

Book review: Cassandra George Sturges- Pretty Blue Ball

Pretty Blue Ball is the first book in Cassandra George Sturges’ Jungle Beauty Goddesses reviewseries. To celebrate their seven millionth birthdays, the septuplets, Sahara, Kalahari, Qattara, Namib, Sinai, Chalbi, and Afar were to be gifted with a planet ball, so they may develop and nurture their own planet. It was an exciting time for the young Godettes, the transition from their current care-free role to that of a goddess. First, they had to journey through their father’s creation and find a single ball which suited each of their needs. Being so different, they thought the task to be impossible, until, at last, they saw the pretty blue ball. They instantly knew it was the one for them, and so the story of Earth, and the life born and nurtured upon it begins.

Cassandra George Sturges‘ Pretty Blue Ball puts a new spin of evolution and creation mythos in this unusual fiction tale. The writing style is predominantly a third-person tell style, interspaced with small sections of thoughts from the goddesses themselves as if written in their diaries. I found it to be quite deadpan in the telling, yet able to hold my interest as I wanted to discover and understand the plot. I thought there was a great deal of imagination behind the plot, and particularly liked the impression given that the figureheads and deities of alternative religions were also the goddesses’ siblings and possessed their own planet balls shaped by their morals and faith. I found Pretty Blue Ball informative and educational, as it guides the reader through the various states of the planet’s life cycle from creation. I enjoyed how the characters’ choices made affected the manner in which humanity evolved, and their own fates. There are some disturbing scene, but the deadpan style of writing prevents the reader from becoming overly engaged in what is occurring. This book has potential, but I found the style of writing too detached to allow me to fully invest in the plot and characters. I did, however, think pictures included were a lovely addition.

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