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A separation and then divorce is difficult enough for any child, but for a new man to be reviewabruptly inserted to Nate’s life as his new ‘dad’ was too much. Then came the mysterious parcel, the visions, the graphic drawings transferred from mind to page in terrifying reality. Not to mention the strange behaviour of his mother. Nate loved his dad, but it had been months since anyone had heard from him. He was  a neuroscientist, but like his son he had a passion for art. But there’s something  about Nate’s drawing that see him something desperately needed by the people of Meer. Abducted from his home in a white flurry he finds himself whisked across the stars to stand before Wishnal. This figure seems to know something of his father, but there’s no  time for  answers, an attack is imminent and Nate, it seems, is their only  hope, but he still has much to learn.

This book  is awesome! Vibrant and  energetic characters living in an amazingly  designed world. Meer put  me in mind of The Grove from Guild Wars 2, the use of plants to create homes, furnishing etc. I considered D. F. Anderson’s The Maker a fantasy/ Sci-fi with some parts making me think of Lovecraft, The Neverending Story, and a little bit A Monster Calls, as well as many great children’s fantasy both on screen and page. This book gets something I rarely give, and that’s my whole hearted recommendation. It may be labelled a children as book, and it will certainly inspire and engage that audience, but it also possesses great value as an adult read, after all, adults need magic and wonder too. In short, great writing style, brilliant ideas, gripping plot, funny to read  basically The Maker is everything you could want in a book.

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