author, book review, reading, writing

Book review: Rabbit: Chasing Beth Rider – Ellen C Maze (@authorellenmaze )

The problem with writing a good book is you never know how far it will reach, nor the reviewimpact it will have on those who read it. Beth was used to the somewhat overzealous fans, but what she wasn’t prepared for was a visit from a monster straight from her tales. He marked her for sport, but when her path crossed with Michael’s he was certain there had been a mistake. She didn’t fit the profile of a rabbit. Her book had been dangerous to their kind, prompting a disconnection that the Elders hadn’t seen for a long time. This woman’s work was dangerous, and to secure their lifestyle she, and her influence, had to be forever silenced.

Rabbit: Chasing Beth Rider is Ellen C Maze’s Christian paranormal. It focuses on Beth Rider, a young novelist whose book has turned the lives of the Rakum upside down. The steady paced novel introduces an increasing level of tension until you daren’t put it down because you just have to see how things will play out. Obviously being a Christian fiction, there is constant, yet not particularly preachy, injection of faith, God, and the power of religion, which means the book would appeal to those who both enjoy a faith orientated read, and those who find an overly-religious tone too oppressive. The balance in this book was good, and central to the unique plotline. This is a fantastic story, with plenty to be taken away from it. The more you read into the meanings, the more messages become apparent. Hope, salvation, fear, threat, challenges, and trials will keep you reading, while the ever-growing characters and their forming bonds will keep you hungry for more.

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author, book review, reading, writing

Book review: Dwelling in Heaven and Earth by E.A. Comiskey (@eacomiskey )

For as long as Shifrah can remember conformity has been taught, encouraged. People reviewlook same, dress the same, hang the same artwork. They are educated in the way of peace from birth to death, but when faced with differences outside their scope of comfort practising what is preached is another matter altogether. Shifrah was born slightly different, darker than most with a skill she worked to keep hidden. Her gran joked she was a genetic kickback, but standing out is never a blessing. She thought she was the only one until she caught a glimpse of Donovan. She had read about this figure, the son of the ancient prophetess, and a blood drinker. He had come to relay a message, a warning to all that their time of peace and of ignorance coming from to an end. But they had known peace for so long, and felt shelter and comfort within their fortress that they were certain no harm could befall them. Shifrah saw the danger in their arrogance, and Donovan awakened something within her, a repressed desire to embrace not only her individuality, but his as well. Desires she thought she would never know stir, leading her to a path of darkness she must navigate if she hopes to remain the person she wishes to be, the person who wants to protect those she loves.

I read and enjoyed the first book in the series, this one however, I loved. The plot, the characters, everything, seemed far more engaging, a true testament to the author’s growth and development. Don’t get me wrong, the first book in a great read, but this one was more my style of book. I enjoyed the inner conflicts of Shifrah, watching her struggle to both conceal and embrace who she is. The relationships she forges influence the person she is and who she will become. It was a deep and engaging read driven by characters, emotions, and conflict. As I said above, I have read the first book in the series, but it would also work well as a stand alone, any important missing information is skilfully filled in throughout the plot to achieve a self-contained story. I really enjoyed reading this, and look forward to seeing more work from E.A. Comiskey

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Dwelling in Heaven and Earth